Horgi - Keen and Gregarious

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Horgi

The Horgi is also known as the Siborgi and is a cross between the Siberian Husky and the Corgi. This is a small to medium sized dog with a life expectancy of 12 to 15 years. He is a very keen dog, eager to please and quite gregarious, loving social gatherings, making new friends and being outgoing. He is suitable to live in smaller spaces like apartment as long as he still gets daily exercise.

Here is the Horgi at a Glance
Average height 13 – 15 inches
Average weight 20 to 50 pounds
Coat type If like a Corgi double, thick, long. If like the Husky's double, medium, dense, straight
Hypoallergenic? No
Grooming Needs Moderate to high
Shedding Fairly high to very high during seasonal shedding times
Brushing Daily
Touchiness Moderate to high
Tolerant to Solitude? Low to moderate
Barking Occasional to frequent
Tolerance to Heat Moderate
Tolerance to Cold Excellent
Good Family Pet? Very good to excellent
Good with Children? Good to very good with socialization
Good with other Dogs? Good to very good with training
Good with other Pets? Good with socialization or being raised with them
A roamer or Wanderer? Moderate
A Good Apartment Dweller? Moderate
Good Pet for new Owner? Fairly good
Trainability Fairly easy but needs a firm, consistent and positive approach
Exercise Needs Moderate – a long walk a day with play
Tendency to get Fat Fairly high
Major Health Concerns Eye problems, skin problems, DM, epilepsy, back problems, PDA, Von Willebrand's Disease
Other Health Concerns Hip dysplasia, obesity
Life Span 12 to 15 years
Average new Puppy Price $300 to $700
Average Annual Medical Expense $485 to $600
Average Annual Non-Medical Expense $500 to $600

Where does the Horgi come from?

The Horgi can be bred from the Pembroke Welsh Corgi or the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. Both the Corgi and the Husky have a history of being working dogs. As part of a growing trend to create deliberate mixed breeds the Horgi is also called a designer dog. Designer dogs have been popular for the last 25 years or so and are still going strong. Some dog people do not approve as it has caused an increase in Puppy Mills and disreputable breeders looking to make money and producing dogs with no care about their health or well being. If you want a hybrid dog make sure you find a good breeder. Since most of these dogs do not have origins, reasons for breeding or any details known about them the best way to see where the Horgi comes from is to look to the parents.

The Siberian Husky

The Siberian Husky is thought to come from a tribe of Siberian nomads called the Chukchi and is one the oldest breeds around. They were bred to pull sleds, be companions and they would sleep with the tribe's children at night to offer warmth and comfort for them. In 1908 they were brought to Alaska during the gold rush to pull sleds. They were also used in dogsled racing where they are still used today. In 1930 when the borders were closed the dogs were no longer imported in, but the breed continued to thrive within America and while some changes happened it still has some of its core qualities.

Today this dog is still a pack animal and this means he prefers being with the rest of his pack or family and he needs you as pack leader to clearly establish your dominance. When it comes to training he will test that dominance and try to take control so you need to be ready to reassert yourself as needed. A well bred and trained Husky has a lot of energy and will need plenty of exercise still. He will also be loving and affectionate to the family, have a playful side and be gentle and friendly. He does not bark but does howl.

The Corgi

There are two varieties of Welsh Corgis, the Pembroke and the Cardigan. Until 1934 they were actually registered as one breed as there are many similarities however the Cardigan tends to be a little bigger and heavier and have long tail. The Cardigan is actually older than the Pembroke too, it is believed he has been in Wales for over 3000 years used to drive cattle and bred to be affectionate, sensible, fun loving, great with children and active. Compared to the Pembroke Corgi he is more territorial and less social. He is intelligent and trainable but can be independent so may opt to do something his way now and then!

The Pembroke Corgi was also bred to be a working dog on the farms in Wales and it is thought his origins either come from the Vikings in the 9th to 10th centuries or the Flemish weavers in the 12th century. It is this Corgi that is popular with the Queen of England, Elizabeth II who has a pack of them. Though they are still used as working dogs by some today they are more often now a family pet. They are loving, intelligent, happy in nature but have a stubborn side to them. While they are fairly easy to train they will not be subservient to you and retain some independent thoughts. They are prone to obesity because of their love of food.

Temperament

The Horgi is great dog, sweet in temperament and friendly but alert. He is gentle and makes a great companion and family dog. He enjoys being active and is eager to please. He is intelligent too and this means as long as you can be firm he is fairly easy to train. He is very keen about everything and being gregarious enjoys company, family action and being at the center of attention and activity. While he is alert his love of all people means he is not a great watchdog. He tends to be agreeable and devoted to his pack.

What does a Horgi look like

The Horgi is a small to medium sized dog and is low set to the ground like the Corgi. It is thought the idea of this breeding might have been to get the Husky look but with the Corgis smaller and lower set stature. He weighs between 20 to 50 pounds and stands around 13 to 15 inches tall. This means he is quite a sturdy looking dog but with short legs. He head is rounded and he has eyes that are almost almond shaped and ears that can be erect. His coat can look like the Corgi or the Husky and common colors are sable, black, cream, white, orange, brown, blue, red or brown.

Training and Exercise Needs

How active does the Horgi need to be?

He needs a moderate amount of activity, a walk a day plus some play time will keep him happy and healthy. While his needs may be more moderate than some dogs he can still become destructive and poorly behaved when he does not get enough exercise. He has a lot of energy and access to a yard where he can spend one or two hours a day on top of his walks is quite important as part of a way to give him what he needs. He should also have the chance to have off leash time in a dog park somewhere, let him play with other dogs, play with you games like fetch or tug of war and so on.

Does he train quickly?

Early socialization and training are important in any dog to bring out the best in them, and to make life easier for you too. He is intelligent and eager to please and these are key traits that make a dog easier to train. However he can have a stubborn side and the husky in him needs a strong pack leader. Be firm, consistent and positive and you should find training goes well. Some Horgis are harder to housebreak than other dogs though and this may need more time spent.

Living with a Horgi

How much grooming is needed?

He is not hypoallergenic and does shed all year around so you will need to vacuum up hair after him, and brush him daily to try and keep on top of it. This means he can require more time spent on his grooming needs than some dogs. When bathing keep it to when he really needs it, use a dog shampoo and since he has a water resistant coat be prepared it can take more time to get him soaped up and rinsed off. He will need his ears checked once a week and given a wipe to clean them, his teeth brushed at least three times a week and his nails clipped if they grow too long. Dog nails or not like human's, they have nerves and vessels in them which means if you cut too low you can hurt your dog and cause bleeding. To avoid this learn how to cut safely from either research or asking your vet, or have it done at a professional dog groomer's.

What is he like with children and other animals?

When he has received early socialization and training you can expect the Horgi to be good with children and other pets, and being raised with them also helps. Since he can be unpredictable with cats and other dogs otherwise introducing him from a young age to different animals, dogs, situations and so on is a very important stage in his learning and development. Also teaching the children how to behave with him is important too.

General information

This is not a good dog if you want a watchdog as he is too friendly with strangers. He is best suited to cold climates rather than hot ones. He should be fed high quality dry dog food 11/2 to 21/2 cups a day split into two meals. Watch his treats and food as he can become obese easily and his low body means weight problems also lead to back problems.

Health Concerns

He tends to be fairly healthy but as with any dog he could inherit his parents genetic disorders or be more prone to certain conditions because they are. For the Horgi this includes Eye problems, skin problems, DM, epilepsy, back problems, PDA, Von Willebrand's Disease, Hip dysplasia and obesity. To get a healthy dog you should ask to see health clearances, not just for him but for the parents too. A good breeder should be able to offer you this. By not buying from breeders who do not you are raising the standards expected and taking money away from the puppy mills.

Costs involved in owning a Horgi

A Horgi puppy will cost about $300 to $700. Prices of designer dogs can get crazy if demand and trend is high. He will need to be neutered, micro chipped, tested for health, and given a collar and leash, a crate and a carrier bag. These costs are between $410 to $460. There are also ongoing costs if being a dog owners that you will need to be prepared for. Medical costs for yearly check ups, vaccinations, flea prevention and medical emergency savings or pet insurance come to $485 to $600. Other costs for food, trainings, toys, license and treats come to $500 to $600 a year.

Names

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  • Horgi Names
  • He is a lovely dog, suitable if you do not have allergies, do not live in a very hot climate and are prepared to have a dog that sheds. He ideally needs a yard but he can adapt to apartment living as long as you can still keep him active in other ways. He would fit right in with families with children, seniors, singles or anyone really who can be a firm pack leader for him.

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