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Bully Basset
Social and Playful

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Bully Basset

The Bully Basset is a cross between the Basset Hound and the Bulldog. Also called Bullet or a Bulldog/Basset Hound Mix he is a medium to large mixed dog with a life span of 8 to 12 years. He is a very friendly and social dog who loves to play but can be tricky when it comes to training.

Here is the Bully Basset at a Glance
Average height 12 to 16 inches
Average weight 40 to 65 pounds
Coat type Straight, dense, short
Hypoallergenic? No
Grooming Needs Moderate
Shedding Moderate to frequent
Brushing Daily
Touchiness Quite sensitive
Tolerant to Solitude? Good
Barking Rare
Tolerance to Heat Low to moderate
Tolerance to Cold Low to moderate
Good Family Pet? Excellent
Good with Children? Very good to excellent
Good with other Dogs? Good to very good with socialization
Good with other Pets? Good with socialization
A roamer or Wanderer? Low to high
A Good Apartment Dweller? Good to very good – adapts quite well as long as gets outside time daily
Good Pet for new Owner? Good – better with experienced owner
Trainability Difficult
Exercise Needs Fairly active
Tendency to get Fat High
Major Health Concerns Bloat, Von Willebrand's, Panosteitis, Eye problems, Patellar Luxation, Thrombopathia, IDD,
Other Health Concerns Reverse sneezing, brachycephalic syndrome, head shakes, hip dysplasia, skin problems, tail problems, allergies, obesity, ear infections,
Life Span 8 to 12 years
Average new Puppy Price $500 to $1100
Average Annual Medical Expense $485 to $585
Average Annual Non-Medical Expense $510 to $610
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Where does the Bully Basset come from?

As one of a large number of deliberately bred mixed dogs the Bully Basset is a Designer dog, created with the idea to have the best of two purebreds in one dog, though this is not something that can really be guaranteed. First generation mixed dogs could in fact have any aspect from either parent, there can even be wide differences in the same litter. Over the last couple of decades the demand for designer dogs has increased dramatically. As a result while there are breeders out there who care and can be trusted there are also many who cannot, think puppy mills for example. Take care about what breeders you buy from. As there is little to no data on most designer dog beginnings looking at the parent dogs can help give us an idea of where they come from. Here is a look at the Bully Basset's parents.

The Bulldog

The Bulldog comes from England sometime in the 1500s where he was used in bull baiting. This was a popular spectator sport back then and they really thought that it tenderized the bull's meat. Eventually when it was outlawed people thought that would be the end of the Bulldog as all he had been bred for in terms of personality and appearance was bull baiting. However some admired this dog and decided to try and breed him to get a more docile temperament.

Today he is courageous still but also sweet, dignified but kind and oh so stubborn which means he is harder and slower to train.

The Basset Hound

Originally bred in France the Basset Hound (Basset meaning low referring to how low to the ground his body is) they can be traced back to the 16th century. They were used as hunting dogs as they could track prey especially hare and rabbit under brush so well.

Today they are mild mannered dogs, very laid back and gets along with children, other dogs and other animals. He is still alert enough to nark when an intruder enters the home so makes a good watch dog. He is pretty stubborn making him hard to train though his love of food can be a way to get him through it! He is not good being left alone because he is very much a pack dog.

Temperament

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The Bully Basset is a loving, loyal and social dog. He loves to meet new people and make more friends, all of whom can give him more attention. He is playful and bold having little fear about anything. He does have a stubborn side but with training and socialization you can get through that. He will certainly entertain you but watch out for his chewing tendencies. When it comes time to relax or sleep he will happily snuggle with you.

What does the Bully Basset look like

This dog is a medium to large size weighing 40 to 65 pounds and standing 12 to 16 inches tall. He has large paws, floppy ears and a short, dense, straight coat. Common colors are cream, brown, white, red and black.

Training and Exercise Needs

How active does the Bully Basset need to be?

He is fairly active so will need regular exercise each day to stay healthy and happy. The Bully Basset at his larger size may be better in a house rather than an apartment but at the lower end he can adapt to it. Take him on at least a couple of walks a day, give him access to a yard to play in if possible and take him to a dog park for a chance to roam free and play games with you. While he has energy he does not have a lot of stamina so short to moderate bursts of exercise rather than long hikes is best.

Does he train quickly?

This is not a quick dog to train so if time or commitment is problem this is not the best option for you. He is stubborn and hard to train so experienced owners rather than first timers is preferable. Keep patient and calm while maintaining a positive attitude and approach. Use treats, rewards and praise to keep him motivated and to encourage him. Early socialization and training are a very important part of pet ownership.

Living with a Bully Basset

How much grooming is needed?

There is a moderate amount of grooming needed with the Bully Basset. He sheds a moderate to frequent amount so will need daily brushing as well as regular vacuuming to keep him and the home at an acceptable level of loose hair! When he comes home dirty or when he is getting smelly give him a bath using a dog shampoo that is better for his skin. Do not bathe him too often though as it also affects the natural oils there. His ears need to be checked for signs of ear infection and should be wiped clean once a week. His nails should be clipped when they get too long, this can be done at a groomer, a vet or by yourself with the right tools and knowledge. His teeth need to be cleaned regularly also, two to three times a week of brushing if possible.

What is he like with children and other animals?

He is good with children, he loves to play with them and is loving towards them when they are part of his family. Early socialization and training help with his interactions with them, other animals and other dogs.

General information

He barks rarely but can snuffle and snore and make grunting noises like a Bulldog. He should be fed 2 1/2 to 3 cups of good quality dry dog food a day, split into two meals. He is not good in extreme temperatures so should be kept in a moderate climate or closely monitored when it is hot or cold.

Health Concerns

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Health issues that a Bully Basset can inherit from parents include Bloat, Von Willebrand's, Panosteitis, Eye problems, Patellar Luxation, Thrombopathia, IDD, Reverse sneezing, brachycephalic syndrome, head shakes, hip dysplasia, skin problems, tail problems, allergies, obesity and ear infections. Before you buy make sure the breeder can show you parental health clearances and visit the puppy to see the conditions he is kept in.

Costs involved in owning a Bully Basset

The Bully Basset puppy could cost between $500 to $1100. Other costs for blood tests, chipping, deworming, shots, neutering, a collar, leash and crate come to between $445 to $500. There are going to be costs to be prepared for over the year also. Basic medical needs like shots, flea prevention, health insurance and check ups come to between $485 to $585. Basic non medical costs come to between $510 to $610 for things like food, training, license, treats and toys. There may be other costs, grooming, kennels, additional medical care for example. This can vary from one dog to another.

Names

Looking for a Bully Basset Puppy Name? Let select one from our list!

  • Male Bully Basset Puppy Names
  • Female Bully Basset Puppy Names
  • This is a dog that could be well suited to family life or as a companion for a single or couple. He can get along with children and other pets with socialization and when raised with them too. His training will require more commitment but if you are prepared for this he is worth it and will be very loyal and loving in return.

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